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Sheila A. Millar is a partner at Keller and Heckman LLP, where she represents businesses and trade associations on a variety of public policy and regulatory issues, including privacy, data security, cybersecurity and advertising matters, as well as product safety issues. She has been involved in a variety of audit and compliance projects, including, among other issues, privacy and data security audits, and is experienced in providing crisis management legal support to a variety of national and international companies and associations.

Ms. Millar is a frequent speaker on regulatory and public policy matters, and has authored many articles. Ms. Millar is one of the vice chairs of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Marketing and Advertising Commission, and chair of its Working Group on Sustainability, where she spearheaded the development of the ICC Framework Guides on Environmental Marketing Claims.

Ms. Millar is AV® PreeminentTM Rated by Martindale-Hubbell and for the eigth consecutive year was selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2018 for her work in practicing Advertising Law. She has also received the distinguished honor of Advertising Law "Lawyer of the Year" 2014 in Washington, DC by Best Lawyers®, and was awarded Advertising and Marketing Lawyer of the Year USA by Finance Monthly for their Finance Monthly Global Awards 2017.

On January 7, 2020, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released a draft of revised cybersecurity recommendations for IoT devices at both the pre-market and post-market stages. NISTIR 8259, Recommendations for IoT Device Manufacturers: Foundational Activities and Core Device Cybersecurity Capability Baseline, identifies six voluntary steps manufacturers should take to account

Businesses that rely on standard contractual clauses (SSCs) to transfer personal data outside the European Economic Area (EEA) just got good news. The long-awaited decision from the EU Advocate General (AG) is here: SCCs are valid. The AG’s opinion, although non-binding, is significant for the case brought by Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems against Facebook,

From beauty gurus on Instagram to product reviewers on YouTube, influencers are big business for brands. However, the intentions aren’t always clear when reading the advice of a celebrity fitness trainer who was paid for his endorsement or watching a video of a fashionista who just received a new wardrobe from the clothing company she

You know that movie where a person thinks they’ve barricaded themselves in their house against a stalker, only to grasp the awful realization that the threat is “coming from inside the house”? Unbeknownst to you, that threat may, in fact, be coming from your smartphone, according to a complaint by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

In the two decades following the enactment of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection (COPPA) Rule, technological developments have changed the online landscape considerably. Recognizing this, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) held a public workshop on October 7, 2019, to discuss whether, given the proliferation of smart devices, video games, online channels, and EdTech, the Rule,

Many consumers are drawn to products advertised as healthy and natural, and will often pay a premium for organic products, from foods to personal care items to clothing. But the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) takes a dim view of companies that don’t live up to their green promises. Case in point: Miami-based Truly Organic and