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Sheila A. Millar is a partner at Keller and Heckman LLP, where she represents businesses and trade associations on a variety of public policy and regulatory issues, including privacy, data security, cybersecurity and advertising matters, as well as product safety issues. She has been involved in a variety of audit and compliance projects, including, among other issues, privacy and data security audits, and is experienced in providing crisis management legal support to a variety of national and international companies and associations.

Ms. Millar is a frequent speaker on regulatory and public policy matters, and has authored many articles. Ms. Millar is one of the vice chairs of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Marketing and Advertising Commission, and chair of its Working Group on Sustainability, where she spearheaded the development of the ICC Framework Guides on Environmental Marketing Claims.

Ms. Millar is AV® PreeminentTM Rated by Martindale-Hubbell and for the eigth consecutive year was selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2018 for her work in practicing Advertising Law. She has also received the distinguished honor of Advertising Law "Lawyer of the Year" 2014 in Washington, DC by Best Lawyers®, and was awarded Advertising and Marketing Lawyer of the Year USA by Finance Monthly for their Finance Monthly Global Awards 2017.

Interested in environmental marketing? Do you make and sell plastic products? Partner Sheila Millar and Counsel Boaz Green discuss a bill likely to become law in California that further restricts environmental marketing claims for plastic products sold in California. AB 2287 would expand restrictions on plastic degradability claims by effectively banning marine degradable claims. Read

More than 160 million Americans play video games. Originally designed as single-use purchases for consoles or computers, video games are now downloadable, making them more accessible to consumers than ever. One important development for the video game industry has been the creation of “micro purchases” – in-game transactions such as “loot boxes” that players can

Marketing products as environmentally friendly can induce customers to pay higher prices than they would for other goods. But when promises of lower emissions or higher insultation ratings prove false, that hurts consumers, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) steps in. The FTC recently concluded its four-year long false advertising case against Volkswagen and Porsche

Protecting the online privacy of children by enforcing the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) continues to be of paramount importance to federal and state regulators. In addition to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), several state attorneys general (AGs) have brought COPPA actions recently, including the New Mexico and California AGs, and, most notably, the

A recent Federal Trade Commission (FTC) settlement with an online game company that allegedly tracked children illegally highlights some important questions, namely, how should the FTC assess the penalties it imposes for privacy violations, and what is the most effective way to both deter and punish companies for such violations?

The complaint in question was

On June 1, 2020, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra submitted the final package of regulations implementing the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) to the California Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for approval. The regulations reflect key CCPA compliance obligations for businesses, including specific actions that must be taken to allow consumers to exercise their rights

One of the first formal privacy safe harbor programs was created under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). Put simply, businesses are deemed in compliance with COPPA if they belong to an FTC-approved COPPA safe harbor program and follow the safe harbor program’s guidelines. But the FTC takes seriously any false claim about participation

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted regulatory agencies to take swift action against companies that falsely advertise their products as treatments for the virus. As we previously reported, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued joint warning letters to seven companies in March for advertising and selling products or services

Online shopping has taken on greater importance for many people homebound since the coronavirus lockdowns began. And, while many are lounging at home in pajamas and yoga pants, there are still a lot of fashion-conscious shoppers out there anxious to take advantage of bargain prices and speedy deliveries. But how is a stay-at-home fashionista supposed