Photo of Sheila A. Millar

Sheila A. Millar is a partner at Keller and Heckman LLP, where she represents businesses and trade associations on a variety of public policy and regulatory issues, including privacy, data security, cybersecurity and advertising matters, as well as product safety issues. She has been involved in a variety of audit and compliance projects, including, among other issues, privacy and data security audits, and is experienced in providing crisis management legal support to a variety of national and international companies and associations.

Ms. Millar is a frequent speaker on regulatory and public policy matters, and has authored many articles. Ms. Millar is one of the vice chairs of the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) Marketing and Advertising Commission, and chair of its Working Group on Sustainability, where she spearheaded the development of the ICC Framework Guides on Environmental Marketing Claims.

Ms. Millar is AV® PreeminentTM Rated by Martindale-Hubbell and for the eigth consecutive year was selected by her peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2018 for her work in practicing Advertising Law. She has also received the distinguished honor of Advertising Law "Lawyer of the Year" 2014 in Washington, DC by Best Lawyers®, and was awarded Advertising and Marketing Lawyer of the Year USA by Finance Monthly for their Finance Monthly Global Awards 2017.

With millions of Internet of Things (IoT) devices from phones to smart home censors flooding the market every year, effective cybersecurity to help mitigate risks to devices is vital. New guidance from The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), IoT Non-Technical Supporting Capability Core Baseline (NISTIR 8259B), is intended to help manufacturers identify the

On August 31, 2021, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released its draft white paper, DRAFT Baseline Security Criteria for Consumer IoT Devices. The draft white paper is in response to Executive Order (EO) 14028, “Improving the Nation’s Cybersecurity,” which requires NIST, in collaboration with other agencies, to educate the public

On September 13, 2021, President Biden nominated Alvaro Bedoya for Commissioner of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to replace outgoing FTC Commissioner Rohit Chopra. Earlier this year, President Biden nominated Chopra to head the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB). If confirmed, Bedoya would round out the slate of FTC commissioners and solidify the agency’s Democratic

As the Labor Day weekend approaches, the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) are warning U.S. entities to remain alert and protect against the rising incidence of ransomware attacks over holidays and weekends. A joint cybersecurity advisory issued on August 31, 2021 reviews recent ransomware attacks that occurred over

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) took the unprecedented step of removing one of the approved Safe Harbor organizations under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) for failing to provide effective monitoring and assessment of its member companies’ websites, as required under the COPPA Rule. Earlier this year, Commission staff warned Aristotle International, Inc., whose

The Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU), a division of BBB National Programs, recently updated its Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children’s Advertising. Important updates include:

  • To align with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), the Guidelines now apply to national advertising primarily directed to children under the age of 13 instead of under 12, regardless

The circular economy. Sustainability. Single-use plastics bans. Marine litter. Microplastics. Climate change. These are only some of the issues driving the demand for more “environmentally friendly” products. In recent years, we have seen a surge in product and raw material innovations designed to improve environmental performance, and companies around the world are pledging to take

Goods advertised as “Made in the USA” (MUSA) are potential money-makers for manufacturers tapping into the market of consumers who seek home-grown products. In recent years, however, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has investigated companies that deceptively marketed their goods as American-made, sending out warning letters, closing out investigations of companies that quickly change their