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A recent class action lawsuit that claimed a manufacturer misrepresented its laundry detergent products as “all natural” when they, in fact, contained synthetic ingredients, has resulted in a $1.5 million settlement. A New York federal court gave preliminary approval to the settlement, which also requires the company to add qualifying language that states “contains naturally

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Remember those ads from the 80s where an actor would start a medicine endorsement with the disclaimer: “I’m not a doctor, but I play one on TV”? A recent Federal Trade Commission (FTC) settlement order relating to the marketing of the dietary supplements CogniPrin and FlexiPrin is a good reminder about the importance of using

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The newly launched Children’s Confection Advertising Initiative (CCAI), modeled on the Children’s Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) and its Core Principles, is the latest food industry self-regulatory announcement under which participants agree to limit advertising to children under 12 or in elementary schools (from pre-kindergarten through sixth grade). The Council of Better Business

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Lumosity, an online site and smartphone app, is supposed to help its users train their brains so they can achieve their “full potential in every aspect of life.” Unfortunately, the company was unenlightened when it came to avoiding false advertising claims. According to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the company claimed that using its

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On December 17, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) announced that Lifelock, Inc. (LifeLock), agreed to pay a record-breaking $100 million to settle charges that it violated an earlier consent agreement related to flawed data security practices issued in March 2010. The LifeLock settlements implicate both the “fairness” of the company’s data security practices and

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A California federal court this month ruled against defendants’ attempt to rely on a federal law requiring U.S.-origin claims on textile fabric products to displace a California statute with more stringent requirements about “Made in the USA” labels.  The ruling allows a class action suit to proceed, lowering the hopes of retailers and manufacturers that

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Technology is advancing fast, but would you use an app to figure out if you had cancer? According the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), that’s just what two app developers were recommending, but the FTC said they lacked the evidence to back their claims up. The FTC entered into consent agreements with two companies, MelApp and

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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is proposing updates to its labeling and packaging requirements under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA), including deleting specific requirements for commodities advertised using terms such as “introductory offer,” “cents off,” and “economy size.” The proposed changes would also modernize place-of-business requirements,