state laws and regulations

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The Vermont Department of Health won approval for its new, burdensome children’s product green chemistry reporting program from the state’s Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules on November 19, 2015. The final version of the Toxic Substances in Children’s Products Rule took effect on December 10, 2015, and follows from the state’s 2014 green chemistry bill,

Photo of Sheila A. Millar

The Vermont Department of Health has released the final proposed version of its Toxic Substances in Children’s Products Rule (although it is not yet available on the Department’s website) adopted under state’s 2014 green chemistry law, Act 188. The rule, largely unchanged from the proposal, is now scheduled to go before the state’s Legislative

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For everyone concerned about the expanding burden of green chemistry reporting, here’s something that will really make your hair – and bankbook – stand on end: Vermont is proposing to implement the green chemistry law adopted last year by mandating SKU-level reporting.  Yes, you read that correctly.  (Read the proposed rule here.)  The impact

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The flow of data over the Internet creates privacy concerns in strange situations. For instance, when Pandora, the music streaming service, integrated its subscribers’ profile pages with their Facebook accounts, Pandora apparently made music preferences and listening choices available to the subscribers’ friends. The result was a suit alleging a violation of a Michigan statute

Photo of Sheila A. Millar

For the consumer products industry, there is little question that state green chemistry laws are becoming increasingly complex and challenging. Laws are in place from California to Maine, and proposals are bubbling up around the country. States as diverse as Connecticut, New York, Florida, Oregon, and even Mississippi are considering their own green chemistry laws.