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JC Walker practices environmental, product safety and energy efficiency law.

Mr. Walker’s environmental practice focuses on a wide range of matters, including compliance with U.S. requirements governing the safe management and disposal of chemical and hazardous substances under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and state analogues. Mr. Walker regularly advises industry and trade association clients on regulations of hazardous air pollutants under the federal Clean Air Act (CAA) and state and local air pollution statutes, as well as emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in adhesives, paints, and other industrial and consumer products.

Mr. Walker also regularly advises clients on product safety issues. This includes assessing compliance with the Federal Hazardous Substances Act (FHSA), other Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) requirements, and state consumer product requirements.

Additionally, Mr. Walker counsels a broad range of industries on compliance with the U.S. Energy Policy and Conservation Act and California’s energy efficiency regulations. Representative clients include manufacturers and distributors of: consumer appliances; commercial refrigeration equipment; heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment; and computers and consumer electronic devices.

In addition to compliance advice, Mr. Walker regularly represents clients in actions brought by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and other Federal and state agencies.

Mega-retailer Best Buy agreed to pay $3.8 million to settle allegations that the company distributed and sold recalled products, a violation of the Consumer Product Safety Act (CPSA) after the 2008 amendments. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) staff alleged that the retailer sold more than 600 recalled units, including over 400 Canon cameras, to

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) today announced that it had obtained a record $15,450,000 settlement of civil penalty liability from three Gree Electric entities (Gree Electric Appliances, Inc., of Zhuhai; Hong Kong Gree Electric Appliances Sales Co., Ltd.; and Gree USA Sales, Ltd.) (collectively, Gree). (The settlement is provisional until after the public

A California federal court this month ruled against defendants’ attempt to rely on a federal law requiring U.S.-origin claims on textile fabric products to displace a California statute with more stringent requirements about “Made in the USA” labels.  The ruling allows a class action suit to proceed, lowering the hopes of retailers and manufacturers that

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is proposing updates to its labeling and packaging requirements under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act (FPLA), including deleting specific requirements for commodities advertised using terms such as “introductory offer,” “cents off,” and “economy size.” The proposed changes would also modernize place-of-business requirements,