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As expected, Congress’ renewed focus on expanding protections for minors online has resulted in legislative developments that attempt to mitigate harms while adhering to the Constitution’s free speech and preemption parameters. Last month, updates to both the Kids Online Safety Act (KOSA) and the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) 2.0 bills were released

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During 2023, legislative, congressional, and executive actions aimed at protecting children and teens online took center stage. Such actions included: legislative attempts to raise the age of a “child” at both the federal and state levels for advertising and privacy purposes; bans on behavioral advertising targeting minors; efforts to restrict access to social media by

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Children’s and teen’s online privacy and safety – particularly their mental health – continues to be an area of intense scrutiny for lawmakers, regulators, and enforcers. Last May, the Biden administration announced the creation of a new task force focused on the safety, privacy, and wellbeing of children online, linked to an Advisory on Social

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The Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act Rule (COPPA Rule) requires that online sites and services directed to children under 13 obtain parental consent before collecting or using children’s personal information and lists existing methods for such consent. Now the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is seeking comments on whether it should expand its parental consent methods

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At a press conference on August 11, 2022, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC or Commission) announced an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPR), which was published, along with a fact sheet, to explore potential new rules governing what the FTC characterizes as prevalent “commercial surveillance” and “lax data security practices.” The FTC issued the

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The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) took the unprecedented step of removing one of the approved Safe Harbor organizations under the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) for failing to provide effective monitoring and assessment of its member companies’ websites, as required under the COPPA Rule. Earlier this year, Commission staff warned Aristotle International, Inc., whose

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The Children’s Advertising Review Unit (CARU), a division of BBB National Programs, recently updated its Self-Regulatory Guidelines for Children’s Advertising. Important updates include:

  • To align with the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), the Guidelines now apply to national advertising primarily directed to children under the age of 13 instead of under 12, regardless

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After completing its review of testing and labeling regulations for children’s products, staff of the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recommended leaving the current product testing and component part testing regulations as is. The CPSC carried out this review of the “Testing and Labeling Regulations Pertaining to Product Certification of Children’s Products, Including Reliance on